Kim Krett walks into a north-end Saskatoon rest stop and restaurant, briefcase in tow. The manager of the store recognizes him immediately and welcomes him. It’s an unexpected visit by Krett – he’s a public health inspector with Saskatoon Health Region. He’s here to check out the kitchen, the coolers and general cleanliness of the location. Krett is also the administrator of new inspection software called Hedgehog.

Public Health Inspector Kim Krett inspects the kitchen at a rest stop in Saskatoon.

Public Health Inspector Kim Krett inspects the kitchen at a rest stop in Saskatoon.

“Hedgehog allows public health inspectors to take filing cabinets worth of inspection data and put it on a computer,” says Krett. That means precious time that is needed to inspect public facilities isn’t wasted on tracking down paperwork. “It also allows us to share data among inspectors.”

Hedgehog allows inspectors to decrease their preparation time for an inspection. It standardizes the inspection while still allowing room for comments and other information. It leads to a much more detailed inspection.

The team that implemented the Hedgehog software for public health inspections also received a 2013 Saskatoon Health Region Bravo Award. Front row, (l-r) Chantelle Zacharias, Michael Newell, Patricia Tymiak.  Back Row (l to r) Kim Krett,  Jason Jarotski, Kari Engele-Carter.

The team that implemented the Hedgehog software for public health inspections also received a 2013 Saskatoon Health Region Bravo Award.
Front row, (l-r) Chantelle Zacharias, Michael Newell, Patricia Tymiak.
Back Row (l to r)
Kim Krett, Jason Jarotski, Kari Engele-Carter.

“It also lets us map complaints for things like bed bugs, suspected food-borne illnesses and other public health complaints from the public,” says Krett. “When we can see the complaints on a map, we can easily pinpoint the problem areas and respond to them.”

The new inspection software is in use in Saskatoon Health Region and Five Hills Health Region and will eventually be implemented in some form across Saskatchewan. It helps the Region’s 14 public health inspectors do their jobs thoroughly and efficiently. Both regions were recently recognized at the Canadian Institute of Public Health Inspectors President’s Banquet with an Alexander Officer Award. The award recognizes an agency for outstanding and meritorious achievements in the field of public or environmental health.

Back at the convenience store, Krett continues his inspection. He enters the information on each section of the process on his tablet. As soon as he leaves the site, the information will be up to date and he’ll be ready to move on to the next inspection. “Using the new software will allow us to collect and disseminate data in useful ways and it will instil more confidence in the public health inspection system with the use of the new software.”