Karin Diedrich-Closson steps up to marks on the floor in front of a board containing a series of buttons. She waits and as individual lights appear in the four quadrants of the board, she tries to tap them as quickly as possible. It’s one thing to use an assessment and treatment tool to help your clients. It’s a completely different thing to experience it as a client. Diedrich-Closson is an occupational therapist and she’s at Saskatoon City Hospital to participate in a tournament put on by her colleagues to share information on the Dynavision board in the rehabilitation unit there. This activity is part of national occupational therapy month.

Karin Diedrich-Closson tests herself on the Dynavision board to learn about how it helps assess clients’ abilities.

Karin Diedrich-Closson tests herself on the Dynavision board to learn about how it helps assess clients’ abilities.

For clients who have experienced a stroke, brain injury or neurological impairment and have had to curtail their activities, the Dynavision board can help determine what their abilities are and where they still need therapy. It was originally designed to improve performance among athletes, including National Hockey League goalies. It’s one tool in an arsenal used by OTs to assess and treat clients for eye-hand coordination, visual and motor skills, reaction times and visual and perceptual impairment. By improving these abilities, clients are able to improve their function in activities they wish to resume, such as driving, self-care and leisure activities.

The system was purchased through the generous support of Orest and Pauline Sadownick, along with their adult children Paul, Murray and Shona who donated to the Saskatoon City Hospital Foundation.