Royal University Hospital (RUH) is recognizing the Jewish celebration of Hanukkah December 6-14.

Rabbi Raphael Kats of Saskatoon brought a Menorah, the traditional seven-stemmed candle stick, to display in the mall area of RUH during this time. This Menorah is one made for the Jewish community in Saskatoon, and is a beautiful example of the sacred symbol.

A Menorah, the traditional seven-stemmed candle stick,is on display in the mall area of RUH for Hanukkah.

A Menorah, the traditional seven-stemmed candle stick,is on display in the mall area of RUH for Hanukkah.

What does the holiday of Hanukkah celebrate?

Hanukkah- the eight-day festival of light that begins on the eve of the 25th of the Jewish month of Kislev – celebrates the triumph of light over darkness, of purity over adulteration, of spirituality over materiality.

More than 21 centuries ago, a small band of Jews defeated one of the mightiest Greek armies on earth to reclaim their Holy Temple in Jerusalem and rededicate it to the service of God. When they sought to light the temple’s menorah, they found only a single cruse of olive oil that had escaped contamination; miraculously, the one-day supply burned for eight days, until new oil could be prepared under conditions of ritual purity.

The festival of Hanukkah commemorates these miracles. At the heart of the festival is the nightly menorah lighting: a single flame on the first night, two on the second evening, and so on till the eighth night of Hanukkah, when all eight lights are kindled.

It is traditional to eat foods fried in oil on Hanukkah, to eat dairy foods during the holiday, to give money gifts to children, and to play dreidel games. It is also customary to give an increased amount of charity each day of Hanukkah. There are also certain passages that are added to the daily prayers and grace after meals.