“Over the past three weeks, since the radioisotopes produced by the Fedoruk Centre were approved for clinical use, we have scanned over 150 patients using Saskatchewan-made isotopes,” says Dr. Paul Babyn, Head of the Department of Medical Imaging and Nuclear Medicine. “Having a local supply means we can better respond to patient demand and scan our patients without delivery concerns.”

Dr. Paul Babyn, Head of Medical Imaging and Nuclear Medicine speaks at Friday’s event at RUH.

Dr. Paul Babyn, Head of Medical Imaging and Nuclear Medicine speaks at Friday’s event at Royal University Hospital.

On Friday, June 24, an event was held at Royal University Hospital’s (RUH) SaskTel Theatre to celebrate the official beginning of Saskatchewan-made radioisotopes now being used to scan patients in our PotashCorp PET/CT Centre. The radioisotopes used in the PET/CT help medical professionals diagnose and better understand how a patient is responding to treatment. The new radioisotopes come from the Fedoruk Centre, located at the Cyclotron on the University of Saskatchewan.

A local supply of radioisotopes is so important because of their short life. Radioisotopes immediately start to breakdown once they are produced. Up until today, RUH had to wait for a delivery of isotopes by plane every day from Ontario. “There was always a risk that the radioisotopes would be delayed or flights cancelled which immediately impacted patients,” says Dr Babyn. “A secure, local source is so important.”

Want to know more? Watch this short video from the Fedoruk Centre on how radioisotopes for clinical and research use are created, and how they are delivered and used at the PotashCorp PET/CT Centre at RUH – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=47z6b3XPm4s&feature=youtu.be